Over rock and under tree

Well, that was fast. In a matter of a few weeks, I made the jump from Knight Wazer to Royalty Wazer, after having driven a total of 4,665 miles. It is interesting to me that, during this period of two and a half weeks, the point value required to reach royalty did not change. It makes sense to me that this value may be recalculated less frequently, perhaps on a weekly or monthly basis, but I crossed both week and month boundaries without the point value being updated.

This indicates to me that the activity at the 1% mark for Waze members—at least in North Carolina—is stagnant, as the 1% bar is not moving. Thus, in North Carolina less than 1% of the total Waze membership is highly active.

Roads go ever ever on

Last November I joined the Waze traffic and navigation community. I’ve been using Waze since then for my daily commute and also used it for our family’s Thanksgiving trip. My commute time is 35 minutes in one direction compared to the national average of 25 minutes.

It is now mid-February, three months later, and I’m a little surprised at how rapidly I’ve been able to progress in ranking. Just today I received the Waze Knight status, which means that I am in the top 4% of users in my state, North Carolina.

Thus far I have driven only 3,472 miles with Waze. The majority of my Waze points come from driving miles, although I have achieved a fairly normal set of bonus points (for example, using Waze four days out of one week). That is not a lot of activity to reach the top 4%!

If I’d had to guess, I would have expected that somewhere in the neighborhood of 20% of Waze’s user base was fairly active. But from my experience, at least in North Carolina I would say that number must be less than 5% and could be much less than that. Now I’m very curious to see whether and how quickly I’m able to reach the top 1%.

Minecraft

At Christmas the kids caught the Minecraft bug from their cousins. They pooled their birthday and chore money and bought it. They’ve been enjoying tinkering around with it, together with the help of some books we reserved at the library. Today I installed Ubuntu on the old Windows XP laptop, and voila! We have a dedicated Minecraft computer now.

Defect

defect

Root cause: powdery snow
Resolution: usage error

Concerning intermittent things, I am still tickled by the old Microsoft Word tip of the day, “Things that go away by themselves can come back by themselves.”

Concerning intermitten things, it seems prudent to assume that things that go away at great speed can come back at great speed.