Bluemix Local on PureApplication System

Bluemix Local on PureApplication System

I’d like to offer my congratulations to a number of my PureApplication colleagues for the successful release last month of their work to support BlueMix Local on PureApplication System.

While you may have missed it in the original announcement of Bluemix Local, PureApplication System is the premier home for deploying Bluemix Local on-premise, because it combines Bluemix with the strengths of PureApplication, including unified hardware and firmware management and Call Home.

PureApplication in ASEAN

I recently visited Indonesia and the Philippines with other members of the PureApplication team for a PureApplication road show. We had a productive visit with the local sales teams and with customers in these countries. It was exciting to witness firsthand how well represented PureApplication is in the ASEAN market!

We had profitable discussions on many topics, including PureApplication’s new Power8 offering, RAID 10 support on PureApplication, and various possibilities for running GPFS (now IBM Spectrum Scale) on PureApplication in Active-Active and Active-Passive modes.

From left to right, my colleagues Meng Cher, Jaric, myself, and Bank. This was the day we all accidentally dressed in blue:

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Adding a network interface to your PureApplication VM

You can add a network interface to a virtual machine deployed on PureApplication System from the virtual machines view:

addnic

However, this step only configures the new interface at the hypervisor. You must also configure the interface within the virtual machine. This step differs depending on the operating system. For RedHat, see my other post on adding network interfaces to a RedHat virtual machine. For AIX, you would perform steps like the following to discover (cfgmgr) and configure (chdev) the new interface:

# lsdev
. . .
en0        Available       Standard Ethernet Network Interface
en1        Available       Standard Ethernet Network Interface
. . .
# cfgmgr
# lsdev
. . .
en0        Available       Standard Ethernet Network Interface
en1        Available       Standard Ethernet Network Interface
en2        Defined         Standard Ethernet Network Interface
. . .
# chdev -P -l en2 -a mtu_bypass=on      # Enable largesend
en2 changed
# chdev -l en2 -a netaddr=172.20.202.2 -a netmask=255.255.248.0 -a state=up
en2 changed
# ifconfig -a
en0: flags=1e084863,4c0<UP,BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST,GROUPRT,64BIT,CHECKSUM_OFFLOAD(ACTIVE),LARGESEND,CHAIN>
        inet6 fd8c:215d:178e:1234:b1ec:97ff:fe24:e66f/64
        inet6 fe80::a8ab:50ff:fef4:cc04/64
         tcp_sendspace 262144 tcp_recvspace 262144 rfc1323 1
en1: flags=1e084863,4c0<UP,BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST,GROUPRT,64BIT,CHECKSUM_OFFLOAD(ACTIVE),LARGESEND,CHAIN>
        inet 172.20.202.243 netmask 0xfffff800 broadcast 172.20.207.255
         tcp_sendspace 262144 tcp_recvspace 262144 rfc1323 1
en2: flags=1e084863,4c0<UP,BROADCAST,NOTRAILERS,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST,GROUPRT,64BIT,CHECKSUM_OFFLOAD(ACTIVE),LARGESEND,CHAIN>
        inet 172.20.202.2 netmask 0xfffff800 broadcast 172.20.207.255
         tcp_sendspace 262144 tcp_recvspace 262144 rfc1323 1
lo0: flags=e08084b,c0<UP,BROADCAST,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST,GROUPRT,64BIT,LARGESEND,CHAIN>
        inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000 broadcast 127.255.255.255
        inet6 ::1%1/128
         tcp_sendspace 131072 tcp_recvspace 131072 rfc1323 1
#

This configuration will persist across reboot. You could also use the interactive smitty tool to configure the interface after you have discovered it.